Whenever humans and animals interact, there is a chance of an incident occurring that results in an injury. Even the most domesticated animals can have bad days, and even the most experienced animal handlers can do something unwise while taking care of the creatures. The chances of an injury can increase with non-domesticated animals found in places such as wildlife preserves and zoos. Austin readers might have heard about a recent unprovoked attack made by a tiger against a zoo employee that resulted in severe injuries for the worker.

The incident happened on Oct. 5 when the worker at the Oklahoma zoo stuck her hand in the 400-pound tiger’s enclosure. The woman suffered severe injuries to her arm that required surgery to save the limb. She was scheduled to undergo additional surgery on Oct. 7. There is no word about her condition.

The owner of the zoo has quarantined the big cat while it undergoes testing for rabies by a veterinarian. The cat has been moved to a part of the zoo reserved for aggressive animals. The owner does not intend to euthanize the animal. The tiger will remain in quarantine for ten days for examination.

This incident is an example that even experienced animal handlers can become victims of animal bites and attacks. Although what happened with the worker is horrific, the incident would have been even worse had a visitor been mauled by the tiger or another animal on the grounds. Victims of such incidents would be entitled to seek compensation for their injuries. Damages could be awarded for pain and suffering, medical bills, loss of work due to recovery time and other expenses incurred because of the accident. An experienced legal professional could help a victim sort out what remedies could be sought as compensation should a victim decide to exercise that right.

Source:  KTEN.com, “Garvin Co. Zoo Owner Moves Animal Following Attack” Alex Belser, Oct. 06, 2013